THEN
Remnants: "How you build a city"
Panel and Voices of Experience
1st January 2021
Remnants: "How you build a city"
Panel and Voices of Experience

Join Panel and Voices of Experience for an afternoon of walking, performance and conversation to celebrate the launch of Remnants, a free newspaper for the Merchant City. Walking Tour led by Conservation Architect Fiona Sinclair, artist Rhona Warwick Paterson’s performance of Outwith and Jade Halbert and Diane Watters in conversation, chaired by Suzanne Ewing of Voices of Experience.

Presented by Panel and Voices of Experience, Remnants is a free newspaper for Glasgow’s Merchant City. Written and illustrated commissions from Tiffany Boyle, Morag Cross, Jade Halbert, Caitlin MacLeod, Rhona Warwick Paterson, Diane Watters, Laura Richmond and Louise Welsh and conversations between Fiona Sinclair with Mairi Laverty, Adele Patrick with Akiko Kobayashi, Kirsteen Borland with Heather Claridge and Anne Duff with Cathy Houston, pay attention to how women’s contributions have been rendered in/visible through the formation and use of urban space in Glasgow’s Merchant City and beyond.

Remnants is commissioned by Civic Room and as part of ‘Of Lovely Tyrants and Invisible Women’, featuring four solo exhibitions by artists, Lauren Printy Currie, Ashanti Harris, Thulani Rachia and Marija Nemčenko and a newspaper publication by Panel.

Generously supported by Historic Environment Scotland

View the Remnants Newspaper online.

LATER
HUBRIS
Christian Noelle Charles, Liv Fontaine, William Joys and Wassili Widmer
1st January 2021
HUBRIS
Christian Noelle Charles, Liv Fontaine, William Joys and Wassili Widmer

As part of the Gi2020 opening events at SWG3, Glasgow not-for-profit gallery Civic Room presents Hubris, a programme of performances exploring the human and the nonhuman, featuring new work by Christian Noelle Charles, Liv Fontaine, William Joys, and Wassili Widmer.

In ancient Greece, hubris signified an overreaching arrogance that angered the gods and led to the offender’s downfall. Here, hubris can be an act of transgression, one that challenges social norms in a way that may be inhumane or all too human. Fontaine challenges patriarchal pride and the idea of hysteria with musical accompaniment by Edwin Stevens; Joys – as a statue – is focused upon his own instability amidst social disruption; Widmer reflects on the promise of transhumanism and the limits of representation and desire; and Charles invites audiences on a fantastical joyride, offering an alternative route before arriving at SWG3 in time for the launch event.

Curated by Civic Room

Ticketed event, advance booking is required.

This event takes place alongside the Glasgow International x David Roberts Art Foundation (DRAF) Opening Party with artists Nina Beier, Lina Lapelytė and Paul Maheke.

NOW
Some People Say
Liv Fontaine
23rd April—31st May 2020
Some People Say
Liv Fontaine

Some People Say is a new audio work by artist Liv Fontaine who was part of the performance programme Hubris presented by Glasgow not-for profit gallery Civic Room for Gi2020. Opening with the confrontational vocals and frenetic energy of the artist’s live performances, a surreal conversation between Fontaine’s alter ego, Viv Insane and her partner Jim, charts the character’s descent into sickness — climaxing with her transformation into a reptile. Fontaine uses fantasy and searing sarcasm to confront illness and the absurd demands made on the female body within a patriarchal society.

Courtesy of the artist.

Alex Neilson on Drums and Edwin Stevens on Guitar.

This is a new commission for Gi2020’s digital programme.

Listen to the work here

LATER
The Trials and Tribulations of Wet Horse Hair
Dawn Mellor
1st April 2021
The Trials and Tribulations of Wet Horse Hair
Dawn Mellor

For Dawn Mellor’s first exhibition in Scotland, the artist is showing new paintings as part of a long-term project focusing on invented groups of people, predominantly women, in uniform. The project began in 2013 with fictional art collective ‘The Austerians’ and has also included ‘The Doomsbury Group’ and ‘Sirens’.

Mellor’s new series depicts actors such as Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Daniela Nardini and Julie Walters alongside Mellor’s self-portrait on stage in the mid-1990s. In the portraits, drawn mostly from television dramas, these recognisable subjects are cast as members of a judicial system, but depicted in various states of pleasure. Mellor has also added images of real and imagined sea life, in reference to the phrase, ‘bottom feeders’, meaning not only ocean-floor scavengers but also people who benefit from the misfortune of others.

Curated by Young Team
Supported by Glasgow International

With kind assistance from Create London and Studio Voltaire